An Economic Ethics for the Anthropocene

synthetic zerø

In the video below Katherine Gibson (one half of the amazing JK Gibson-Graham feminist economic-geographer duo; unfortunately Julie Graham died in 2010) delivers a powerful and insightful plenary lecture entitled, ‘An Economic Ethics for the Anthropocene‘ (2011), sponsored by the Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group, of the Association of American Geographers.

Abstract:  Over Antipode’s 40 years our role as academics has dramatically changed. We have been pushed to adopt the stance of experimental researchers open to what can be learned from current events and to recognize our role in bringing new realities into being. Faced with the daunting prospect of global warming and the apparent stalemate in the formal political sphere, this essay explores how human beings are transformed by, and transformative of, the world in which we find ourselves. We place the hybrid research collective at the center of transformative change. Drawing on the sociology of science…

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New Book: Thinking with Water

“An exploration of the relationship between water’s cultural meanings and urgent ecological issues.”

the anthropo.scene

McGill-Queens Press has its fall catalogue out and it includes a new book Thinking with Water, which has this companion website describing the project.

Here is the publisher’s description of the book:9780773541795

“An exploration of the relationship between water’s cultural meanings and urgent ecological issues.”


As a life-giving but also potentially destructive substance, water occupies a prominent place in the imagination. At the same time, water issues are among the most troubling ecological and social concerns of our time.

Water is often studied only as a “resource,” a quantifiable and instrumentalized substance. Thinking with Water instead invites readers to consider how water – with its potent symbolic power, its familiarity, and its unique physical and chemical properties – is a lively collaborator in our ways of knowing and acting. What emerges is both a rich opportunity to encourage more thoughtful environmental engagement and a challenge to common oppositions between…

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All societies live by fictions taken as real. What distinguishes cultures of terror is that the epistemological, ontological, and otherwise philosophical problem of representation–reality and illusion, certainty and doubt […] becomes a high-powered medium of domination…

Michael Taussig, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987)

honey bee collapse

Apis mellifera—the honey bee, native to Europe, Africa and Western Asia—is disappearing around the world. Signs of decline also appear now in the eastern honey bee, Apis cerana.

We know what is killing the bees. Worldwide Bee Colony Collapse is not as big a mystery as the chemical companies claim. […] The causes of collapse merge and synthesize, but we know that humanity is the perpetrator, and that the most prominent causes appear to be pesticides and habitat loss.

via Worldwide Honey Bee Collapse: A Lesson in Ecology | NationofChange.